Pam was able to look at my résumé through the eyes of a prospective employer, and by the time she finished, it looked fabulous.
Heather Ellsworth, Massage Therapist

Welcome to Pam Condie Résumés!

 

Carpe Résumé!

stock-photo-22392371-succesful-resume Looking for a new job can be a challenging process, and an opportunity to get in front of the right hiring person can happen at a moment’s notice. Having a well-polished résumé will help you confidently seize the moment. However, creating an effective résumé is not as simple as pushing a button (though that would be nice.) It takes expertise, and this is where I can help. With over 20 years of experience, I will write a résumé that adeptly shapes your skills and strengths to catch a hiring manager’s eye. I can help you seize the moment!
 
Résumé DIY

When the need for a résumé occurs the first reaction is I’ll write my own. This is a challenge because self-prepared résumés rarely get results, i.e., a telephone call to screen you to see if you should be invited for an in-person interview.  If you hear nothing back from a prospective employer, you always wonder what was wrong with your résumé. Did you have an objective? Was it clear and concise?  Were your accomplishments properly highlighted? Was your format clean and compelling?
 
A quality résumé: play for keeps with a powerful tool

Working with a Certified Professional Résumé Writer (CPRW) is an investment in your future, your ability to earn a living in the job you are seeking. The process helps you organize your job history, skills and goals in your own mind.  As a CPRW I will question you in depth and draw out of you ideas and concepts you find valuable but had not considered before. Keep in mind that a prospective employer has no other way of knowing how good an employee you were other than through reading your résumé.  It is a powerful tool to get you what you want…the interview.
 
Professional writing for other occasions
I also offer additional writing services for other events that require a thoughtful, exploratory, and concise writing style.
 
I look forward to working with you.
Pam
 
 
The Process

Getting Started

FAQ

 

 

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Fear: The Emotional Side of Your Résumé

fearWhen I was very young I once told my father that I was afraid of things in general. His response was, “Honey, we are all scared.” I was surprised to hear that response from a battle-hardened trial lawyer like him, but I was also gratified to know that people of all ages have substantial, generalized fears. Thus, it is understandable that anyone looking for a job falls into that universal category.
 
Adding to the problem can be a lack of having adequate tools for the task of landing a good position, starting with a well written résumé and cover letter. As every Boy Scout is taught, being prepared is of the highest value. When you are prepared you can dissipate much of your fear because you will feel more confident in having done all you can to be ready for your next challenge.
 
Most people have ridden a bicycle at some time in their lives. A mortgage broker friend of mine, Evelyn Freitas Rogerson, has done a lot of long-distance cycling. She tells me that when she is faced with pedaling up a hill after being on a flat road for a while is often deceiving. Her anticipation of the effort required to get up the hill usually balloons out of proportion in her own mind. Inevitably, she finds the hill less agonizing in reality to conquer, and, of course, she feels triumphant when she reaches the summit. So it is with preparing your documents that market you for the job search, your résumé, cover letters, post-interview thank you notes and professional references list. When you are prepared for your job search you feel more confident. Your writing, or what you and I write about you, represents you, and you want to be well represented. Take what was your fear and turn it into excitement.

 

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Encore Careers

career redesignIf you ever identified with the words when Mick Jagger sings, “I can’t get no satisfaction,” you might consider a career change as a solution. Especially as we get older, our values and circumstances can shift from money and the security it brings to making a positive difference in the lives of others by working in the helping professions. Nonprofit work can mean a smaller income but, depending on your point of view, this new work can mean you not only “Get what you want. You get what you need.”
A career transition will involve effort – training, networking and increased education – to be successful. It might bring about a drop in income as well so plan accordingly, However, there can be rewards on a different level that are priceless to you as an individual.
Check out Marci Alboher’s New York Times article, “A Switch at Midlife to Make a Difference.”

 

 

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How to Write a Bad Résumé

how to write a bad resumeThere are three surefire ways to write a bad resume:

  1. Make it too long.
  2. Obscure your background with your interpretation of your strengths and skills.
  3. Give a vague chronology.

Continue reading at radiowalker.com

 

 
 

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10 Reasons to Hire a Certified Professional Résumé Writer

 
how to write a bad resume

1: Writing about yourself feels threatening. You feel too close to the subject to be objective. What if you forget to include something important?
 
2: You fear you will sound as if you were bragging and don’t understand how to handle your information. What do you include and what do you leave out?
 
3: You lack confidence in handling English mechanics such as grammar, usage and punctuation.
 
4: You are unsure what the prospective employer is looking for in a new employee.
 
5: Is a cover letter necessary as well? What should it look like?
 
6: What should you state as your objective? Is one required or do you just let the prospective employer look over your skill set and place you where you are most needed in his/her company?
 
7: You took two years off to care for an elderly parent or had gaps in your employment history. Is it possible to handle gaps in a positive way?
 
8: A job interviewer asks, “Tell me about yourself.” Where do you start?
 
9: You need guidance from someone “seasoned” who can manage both the big picture perspective and the detailed point of view of a preparing a résumé.
 
10: A side benefit of completing your new professionally prepared résumé is the boost to your self-esteem, something I see happen with every client. It is gratifying to see your job history packaged attractively. You can turn your nervousness into confidence.

 
 

The Process

Getting Started

FAQ
 
 

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